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Automatic Instacart Bots

Instacart is taking legal action against bots that automatically place orders:

Before it closed, to use Cartdash users first selected what items they want from Instacart as normal. Once that was done, they had to provide Cartdash with their Instacart email address, password, mobile number, tip amount, and whether they prefer the first available delivery slot or are more flexible. The tool then checked that their login credentials were correct, logged in, and refreshed the checkout page over and over again until a new delivery window appeared. It then placed the order, Koch explained.

I think I am writing a new book about hacking in general, and want to discuss this. First, does this count as a hack? I feel like it is, since it’s a way to subvert the Instacart ordering system.

When asked if this tool may give people an unfair advantage over those who don’t use the tool, Koch said, “at this point, it’s a matter of awareness, not technical ability, since people who can use Instacart can use Cartdash.” When pushed on how, realistically, not every user of Instacart is going to know about Cartdash, even after it may receive more attention, and the people using Cartdash will still have an advantage over people who aren’t using automated tools, Koch again said, “it’s a matter of awareness, not technical ability.”

Second, should Instacart take action against this? On the one hand, it isn’t “fair” in that Cartdash users get an advantage in finding a delivery slot. But it’s not really any different than programs that “snipe” on eBay and other bidding platforms.

Third, does Instacart even stand a chance in the long run. As various AI technologies give us more agents and bots, this is going to increasingly become the new normal. I think we need to figure out a fair allocation mechanism that doesn’t rely on the precise timing of submissions.

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